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How to make Secret Phone calls using a Mobile phone – Schneier

10/04/2015

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2015/04/cell_phone_opse.html

His step-by-step instructions for making a clandestine phone call are as follows:

  1. Analyze your daily movements, paying special attention to anchor points (basis of operation like home or work) and dormant periods in schedules (8-12 p.m. or when cell phones aren’t changing locations);
  2. Leave your daily cell phone behind during dormant periods and purchase a prepaid no-contract cell phone (“burner phone”);
  3. After storing burner phone in a Faraday bag, activate it using a clean computer connected to a public Wi-Fi network;
  4. Encrypt the cell phone number using a onetime pad (OTP) system and rename an image file with the encrypted code. Using Tor to hide your web traffic, post the image to an agreed upon anonymous Twitter account, which signals a communications request to your partner;
  5. Leave cell phone behind, avoid anchor points, and receive phone call from partner on burner phone at 9:30 p.m.—or another pre-arranged “dormant” time—on the following day;
  6. Wipe down and destroy handset.

PRACTICING GOOD OPSEC

Central to good privacy, says Wallen, is eliminating or reducing anomalies that would pop up on surveillance radars, like robust encryption or SIM card swapping. To understand the risks of bringing unwanted attention to one’s privacy practices, Wallen examined the United States Marine Corps’ “Combat Hunter” program, which deals with threat assessment through observation, profiling, and tracking. The program teaches Marines to establish a baseline to more easily key in on anomalies in any given environment.

“Anomalies are really bad for what I’m trying to accomplish—that means any overt encryption is bad, because it’s a giant red flag,” Wallen said. “I tried to design the whole system to have as small a footprint as possible, and avoid creating any analyzable links.”

After establishing these processes, Wallen began researching cell phones. As expected, it involved a lot of trial and error. “I was going out and actually buying phones, learning about different ways to buy them, to activate them, to store them, and so on,” said Wallen, who eventually bought a burner phone from a Rite Aid. “I kept doing it until I felt like I’d considered it from every angle.”

When it came to protecting cell phone hardware, Wallen turned to Faraday bags. Invented by English scientist Michael Faraday back in the 19th century, Faraday cages were developed for modern usage with intelligence agencies, law enforcement, and the military in mind. The cages, which can be any type of container, feature metallic shielding material that blocks radio cell, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth connections. Now available to the public, people can transport or store their electronic devices in Faraday bags, preventing hackers, law enforcement, and spies from accessing their private data

How to make a Faraday wallet

http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Make_a_Faraday_Cage_Wallet

Step 1: Make the main pocket

Make the paper money pocket. Layer strips of duct tape to make two sheets, sticky side up, each roughly 7.5 inches by 6.3 inches.

Make the paper money pocket. Layer strips of duct tape to make two sheets, sticky side up, each roughly 7.5 inches by 6.3 inches.

Step 2: Add the metal shielding

Cut two pieces of aluminum foil, each roughly 6.8 inches by 5.5 inches. The foil should be slightly smaller than your sheet of duct tape. Place each sheet of aluminum foil on each sheet of duct tape. Stick Scotch tape on each sheet of aluminum foil to secure it.

Cut two pieces of aluminum foil, each roughly 6.8 inches by 5.5 inches. The foil should be slightly smaller than your sheet of duct tape. Place each sheet of aluminum foil on each sheet of duct tape. Stick Scotch tape on each sheet of aluminum foil to secure it.

Step 3: Make a sandwich

Stick the two sheets of duct tape together, with the foil on the inside. This makes sort of a tape-and-foil sandwich.

Stick the two sheets of duct tape together, with the foil on the inside. This makes sort of a tape-and-foil sandwich.

Step 4: Construct the billfold

Fold the sheet in half, lengthwise, and tape the edges together.

Fold the sheet in half, lengthwise, and tape the edges together.

Step 5: Make a credit card pocket

Cut two pieces of duct tape, each around 4 inches by 2.3 inches. Cut a piece of aluminum foil slightly smaller, and make another duct tape and aluminum foil sandwich. Use smaller pieces of duct tape to tape the credit card pocket on an inside flap.

Cut two pieces of duct tape, each around 4 inches by 2.3 inches. Cut a piece of aluminum foil slightly smaller, and make another duct tape and aluminum foil sandwich. Use smaller pieces of duct tape to tape the credit card pocket on an inside flap.

Step 6: Make an ID card pocket

Cut a piece of packing tape roughly 4 inches by 2.3 inches. Fold the sticky sides together to make a clear plastic window. Use smaller pieces of duct tape to secure the window to an inside flap.

Cut a piece of packing tape roughly 4 inches by 2.3 inches. Fold the sticky sides together to make a clear plastic window. Use smaller pieces of duct tape to secure the window to an inside flap.

Step 7: Test your wallet

Put your cell phone inside and close the mouth of the wallet. If it doesn't ring when you call it, your wallet works!

Put your cell phone inside and close the mouth of the wallet. If it doesn’t ring when you call it, your wallet works!
One Comment
  1. Reblogged this on TheFlippinTruth.

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